Category Archives: Vegan Options

Probars Are a Great Vegan Bar

Trail in Southern Virginia

If you’ve been near a Whole Foods or REI recently, you’ve probably seen these bars on the shelf. They’ve been around for some years, and they are a really tasty, high-calorie, natural, vegan option. My dad introduced Probars to me a long time ago: he carries them for long-distance cycling.

It’s true that almost every long-distance higher gets sick of eating bars at some point in their trip. Cereal bars, protein bars, energy bars, they’re all shaped like a brick and mostly taste like bland sugar… Regardless, many hikers still eat tons of them, as there just isn’t any other way to get so many calories and nutrients in a tiny package. On my hike, my general strategy was to eat one bar a day, supplemented with my trail-made gorp, as a snack between meals. I think this helped break the monotony, and definitely provided some ingredients I wasn’t getting in other foods.

There are two things that make Probars stand out. One is that they are almost entirely made out of real ingredients like fruits, nuts, and seeds. They’re still sweet, but I think they taste something closer to real food. The other main benefit is that they are really high in calories. Ranging from 370-390 in each bar can help you quickly reach the thousands of extra calories that a hiker needs. They weigh 3 oz. each (about .5 oz and nearly 150 more calories than a Clif Bar, which will probably get its own post some day).

I’ve highlighted other options for packing in calories, but sometimes you want something more than just another spoonful of peanut butter. Bars are a natural fit in the typical trail diet. Unfortunately. It’s a common refrain at the top of Katahdin that we’re never eating another bar again. It’s quite funny for me to be writing this now—nearly four years after my thru-hike—because I still have a lingering distaste for energy bars! But sometimes, there just isn’t a better option.

And, once again, here is my standard disclaimer about yet another post that seemingly endorses a specific product from some big company. This blog is focused on accessible options for vegan hikers, which often means eating straight out of grocery stores or sometimes a gas station. When we’re on the trail, what we find is what we eat! I suppose this blog is for the discerning scavenger. Hike on!

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Trail Town Snack: Earth Balance Vegan Cheese Puffs

Julia with our new snack

I’m not usually one for hyper-processed vegan foods, nor do I regularly eat vegan cheese or fake meat. However, I recently had a chance to try the new Vegan Aged White Cheddar Flavor Puffs from Earth Balance. They are delicious. They’re basically corn puffs with a powdery flavored coating, sort of like a vegan version of Pirate’s Booty (I do love the vegan Veggie Booty from the same company). Just to cover my bases, each bag is 4 ounces, has 520 calories and 12 grams of protein, but that’s probably not why they’re a good snack food.

I can’t say that I expect hikers to regularly find these along the Appalachian Trail. But Earth Balance is a pretty big company, which makes me think that once they catch on, we’ll find them more and more in natural food sections in regular grocery stores. I don’t think it’s realistic to consider these puffs to be a regular trail food, but they are great for a special treat in town. We took a bag on a recent day hike in Connecticut, and they were perfect for a salty snack.

Once again, the nature of vegan hiking is that we are generally bound by what foods are accessible and need minimal preparation. That means that I end up eating a lot more processed, corporate-produced foods than I eat in regular life. The only options for eating home-cooked foods are often impractical, especially for long hikes. Cooking, drying, and sending drop boxes of meals ahead of time is intriguing (and something I would like to try more of), but it takes an extensive amount of time and preparation. As I’ve mentioned previously, part of my goal for this blog is to highlight accessible vegan options that make good trail foods.

I love that the vegan-specific food niche seems to be exploding with new options. We can hike and avoid animal products at the same time, whether for animal or environmental reasons, there’s no need to eat dairy or meat on a backpacking trip.

So that’s where we end up today, with a post that endorses another specific vegan product. Oh well, go forth and eat! (and hike!)

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